1907-1994

Dame Elizabeth Maconchy

Elizabeth Maconchy was a fiercely individual British composer who wrote music that was often highly dissonant, contrapuntal, intense, even disturbing—and far from the more pastoral, lyrical music of fellow Britons such as Gustav Holst and Ralph Vaughan Williams (who taught her composition at the Royal College of Music and remained a lifelong friend). She was the only musician in her family and thus lacked some of the musical resources that bolstered the talents and ambitions of other women composers. In a wonderful chapter on Maconchy from Sounds and Sweet Airs: The Forgotten Women of Classical Music, Anna Beer writes that the composer had “no piano-teacher father to produce lessons, no sibling composer with whom to collaborate, no concert halls, no soirées or salons, just an urgent inner compulsion and lifelong commitment to expressing herself in music.” 

That compulsion was nourished by many people in her life: the teachers she encountered at the Royal College of Music; her husband who championed her creative efforts over the course of the more than sixty years they were married; and fellow women musicians who supported her as she supported them. (The composers Imogen Holst and Grace Williams studied with Maconchy in London and met regularly to discuss each other’s music, and the conductor Iris Lemare, the violinist Anne Mcnaughten, and the composer Elisabeth Lutyens created a series of concerts to showcase new music by young composers and strongly promoted Maconchy’s music through the 1930s.)

Maconchy wrote a wide variety of music—symphonies, concertos, ballets, operas, choral works, chamber music (including thirteen astonishing string quartets), and many songs. The two featured here come from the late 1920s. Both are world-premiere recordings, and one of them (“In Fountain Court,” a hushed and meditative song about the coming of sleep) was recorded from a handwritten manuscript in Maconchy’s archive at St. Hilda’s College, Oxford.

Additional Resources

Maconchy’s music is receiving increasing attention, but more editions, performances, and studies of her music are needed. Here are some useful resources for those interested in learning more about her life and work:

Did you know?

Maconchy was picking out the sounds of church bells on the piano at age 6.

Video Recordings

Soprano Joanna Songi and pianist Matthew Fletcher perform Maconchy's "In Fountain Court" (1929). This is the first ever recording of the song. Songi and Fletcher will be releasing a CD of Maconchy songs in early 2023, drawn from manuscripts in Maconchy's archive at St. Hilda's College, Oxford.
Soprano Joanna Songi and pianist Matthew Fletcher perform Maconchy's "Harp Song of the Dane Woman" (1927). This is the first ever recording of the song. Songi and Fletcher will be releasing a CD of Maconchy songs in early 2023, drawn from manuscripts in Maconchy's archive at St. Hilda's College, Oxford.

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